Filed Under:

Where In The Blanks Are The Answers?

Play associated audio

On-Air Challenge: Every answer is a familiar phrase in the form of "_____ for _____ ." Given the word that follows "for," what's the first word that precedes "for"? For example, if you're given "joy," the answer would be "jump" to complete the phrase "jump for joy."

Last Week's Challenge from listener Henry Hook of Brooklyn, N.Y.: What number comes next in the following series: 2, 4, 6, 9, 11, 15, 20, 40, 51, 55, 60 and 90?

Answer: 101 is the next number is a series of numbers, in ascending order, that can be represented in Roman numerals by two characters.

Winner: Barbara Cruse from Florham Park, N.J.

Next Week's Challenge: Name a food item. Divide this word in half. Take the second half followed by the first half twice, and you'll get a familiar saying. If you take the second half twice by the first half, you'll name a well-known person. What are the food item, saying, and person's name?

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to next week's challenge, submit it here. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you Wednesday at 3 p.m. Eastern.

Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Where Jokes Go To Die, And Other Observations From Comic John Oliver

According to Oliver, the White House Correspondents' Dinner is not a good room for comedy — but that wouldn't stop him from hosting. His new show, Last Week Tonight, premiers Sunday on HBO.
NPR

Got My Goat? Vermont Farms Put Fresh Meat On Refugee Tables

Americans don't eat much barbecued goat, but the meat is a mainstay in many African, Asian and Caribbean diets. In Vermont, farmers raise for refugees and immigrants, with hopes to mainstream it.
WAMU 88.5

On National Mall, Native Americans Protest Keystone XL Pipeline

Native Americans from across the country are visiting Washington this week to protest the construction of a controversial pipeline in the Midwest.
NPR

Tech Giants Settle Class-Action Lawsuit

Apple, Google, Intel and Adobe Systems have settled a lawsuit rather than go to trial on allegations they conspired to stop high-tech workers from leaving one company for another to get a better job.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.