A Photographer Changes The Focus In Africa | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio
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A Photographer Changes The Focus In Africa

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When photojournalist Betty Press lived in Africa from 1987 to 2009, she wanted to show a continent different than the one usually portrayed in the media — one of poverty, war and famine. Instead, she focused on the beauty, creativity and courage of the people.

These images are now the subject of a book, I Am Because We Are: African Wisdom In Image and Proverb, in which every photo is accompanied by a different African proverb. Press tells Weekend Edition Sunday host Audie Cornish that the photos, along with the proverbs, celebrate life and the concept of ubuntu, the idea of living harmoniously within a community.

The book is self-published in partnership with Books for Africa. Press says it is "dedicated to the African people who were willing to share their lives with the world through her photographs."

Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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