A Puzzle Riddled With Objects | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio
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A Puzzle Riddled With Objects

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On-Air Challenge: Identify the objects described in a series of riddles from A New Collection of Riddles by Jesse Cochran.

Last Week's Challenge From Listener Sandy Weisz: Name something that is part of a group of 12. Change the first letter to the next letter of the alphabet to name something that is part of a group of nine. What are these things?

Answer: "Cancer" is one of the 12 astrological signs, and "Dancer" is one of Santa Claus' nine reindeer, including Rudolph.

Winner: Oren Helbok from Bloomsburg, Pa.

Next Week's Challenge: Think of a familiar two-word rhyming phrase that starts with the letter F, like "fat cat." Change the F to a G and you'll get another familiar two-word rhyming phrase. What are these phrases?

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to next week's challenge, submit it here. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you Thursday at 3 p.m. Eastern.

Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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