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Islands In The Stream

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On-Air Challenge: Name the well-known island concealed in consecutive letters of each sentence. For example: "Helga is a saucy Prussian." The answer: "Cyprus."

Last Week's Challenge: Take the name of a well-known university in two words. Switch two letters in the respective words; that is, take a letter from the first word, put it in place of a letter in the second word, and put that letter where the first letter was. The result will name something you might take on a camping trip. What are the names of the university and the camping item?

Answer: "Kent State" and "tent stake"

Winner: Rheta Rubenstein from Livonia, Mich.

Next Week's Challenge comes from listener Mike Reiss: Think of a ten-letter occupation ending in "er." The first four letters can be rearranged to spell something that person would study, and the next four letters can be rearranged to spell something else that person would study. What is the occupation?

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to next week's challenge, submit it here. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you Thursday at 3 p.m. Eastern.

Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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