Dog Races The Rails To Manhattan — And Wins New Yorkers' Hearts | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio
Filed Under:

Dog Races The Rails To Manhattan — And Wins New Yorkers' Hearts

Play associated audio

Some stories can only happen in New York.

At 10:39 Tuesday morning, a Metro-North Hudson Line train left the Bronx for Manhattan when Joseph Delia, the engineer, saw a dog running alongside the track.

A small, frisky, brown-and-black dog, "just running like she didn't have a care in the world," Mr. Delia said.

When the train stopped at a signal, the little dog leapt in front of it then began to race ahead of the commuter train. The dog stumbled a couple of times over ties in the track, but Joseph Delia hit his brakes.

"Oh, my God, I was going real slow," he told The New York Post. He didn't want to run over the dog with his 400-ton train and worried that she might put a paw on the electrified third rail. "I was worried," he said, "that she wouldn't make it and get electrocuted."

Some people might suppose that a train full of loud-talking, bagel-gobbling, high-stress New Yorkers might start swearing — well, like New Yorkers — at the little dog for making them late for big meetings, hard bargaining, court depositions and power lunches.

But when a conductor announced they were slowing down because a dog was running in front of the train, passengers began to throng in the front car to cheer.

And when the train pulled into the 125th St. Station in Harlem-Manhattan at last, two transit police officers ran onto the tracks to try to snag the dog.

She ran into their arms.

The passengers "were hooting and hollering," Joseph Delia said. "They were all cheering."

The little dog has been nicknamed "Tie" by railroad cops — for all the ones she leapt over — and is being cared for by the Animal Care & Control Department. Tie looks like a collie and shepherd mix. She has a limp, but seems conspicuously spirited and friendly and can speak, sit and shake her paw on command. There have already been offers to adopt her if no one steps forward to identify her as their dog.

Animal behavior experts no doubt have their own doggie explanations of why canines enjoy a good chase, but I like to think that Tie just trotted in the footsteps of other famous New York characters. Some people just have to leave Yonkers, Boise, Steubenville or Hoboken because they long for the bright lights that shine like nowhere else.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Amazon Deal With Simon & Schuster Raises Questions For Other Publishers

Amazon has received a fair amount of bad press lately over its long-running dispute with the Hachette publishing house. So Monday's announcement of a deal with Simon & Schuster took some industry watchers by surprise.
NPR

From NFL To 'Scandal,' Whole Foods Buys TV Ads To Boost Its Brand

A pioneer in selling organic, sustainable groceries, Whole Foods now finds itself beset by competitors. So it's launching its first national ad blitz to sell socially conscious consumers on its story.
NPR

Obama Has To Balance His Base Without Hurting Dems In Red States

If Democrats have a chance of hanging onto Senate seats in southern states, they need to do well with African American voters. But for President Obama, that creates a difficult balance between turning out the base and energizing GOP voters who don't like him.
NPR

In Silicon Valley, Paying For Access To Peace Of Mind

The San Francisco area is the home to the high-tech sector and has a history of embracing Eastern spirituality. Now the two meet in the yoga and meditation classes popular with the local tech workers.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.