Placido Domingo On Pop Singers And Karaoke | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio
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Placido Domingo On Pop Singers And Karaoke

Placido Domingo is one of the most influential people in classical music. During a 50-year career, he's played more than 140 roles, conducted more than 450 operas, and won just about every award that a human being can win in opera and life.

Domingo has a new album of solo songs and duets with other singers, whose names might surprise you. Take, for example, his version of Shania Twain's "From This Moment On" — a duet with Susan Boyle.

"It was wonderful, first, to discover her," Domingo says. "On these live television programs, sometimes I don't like the way some of the artists are treated. But the talent that comes out is, no doubt, great. You see somebody that is completely unknown, and all of a sudden you hear this sound like an angel."

Domingo's new album is called, simply, Songs. It features guest spots from singers such as Josh Groban, Harry Connick Jr., and Domingo's own son, Placido Domingo Jr. Here, he sits down with NPR's Scott Simon to discuss choosing duet partners, switching from tenor to baritone roles, and singing karaoke at family gatherings.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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