Filed Under:

Roberta Flack's Long And Winding Road

Roberta Flack has been singing in a way that plucks at the heartstrings since 1969, when she recorded the breakthrough song "The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face." She followed that hit with many, many more, including, "Killing Me Softly with His Song," "Where Is the Love" and "The Closer I Get to You."

Flack has released more than 15 albums during her career. On her latest, Let it Be Roberta, she sings her own distinct versions of songs by her fellow travelers through the 1960s and '70s: The Beatles.

"There's a lot of great music in the world, and The Beatles are certainly responsible for a whole bunch of it," Flack says. "I love the stories the songs tell. I love the simplicity — the fact that they're so accessible. When I got ready to do this album, I had to smack my hand and say, 'Keep going!' I just got so involved."

Here, Weekend Edition Saturday host Scott Simon speaks with Flack about the new album, living across the hall from John Lennon and Yoko Ono, and a fateful performance of the Beatles classic "Here, There and Everywhere."

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Not My Job: Sharon Jones Gets Quizzed On Handshakes

We've invited the lead singer of Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings to play a game called "Let's shake on it."
NPR

Salvage Supperclub: A High-End Dinner In A Dumpster To Fight Food Waste

The ingredients — think wilted basil, bruised plums, garbanzo bean water — sound less than appetizing. Whipped together, they're a tasty meal that show how home cooks can use often-tossed foods.
NPR

Pitching A 'Clintonville' Protest During The Democratic Convention

Anti-poverty activists organized a tent city in one of Philadelphia's poorest neighborhoods to protest the Democratic National Convention.
NPR

How Your Health Data Lead A Not-So-Secret Life Online

Apps can make managing health care a lot easier, but most don't have the privacy protections required of doctors and hospitals. And a simple Web search can clue in advertisers to health concerns.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.