Ralph Nader's $2,680 Airplane Aisle Seat | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio
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Ralph Nader's $2,680 Airplane Aisle Seat

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When Americans traveled by stagecoach, they had to worry about rocks, rattlesnakes, robbers and other varmints. But I wonder if there weren't fewer passenger complaints.


Ralph Nader is not running for president this year. But he's giving a couple of speeches in Dallas this weekend and booked an American Airlines flight a couple of weeks ago for a $750 fare.


The flight takes three hours. Mr. Nader is 6 feet, 4 inches tall. His longtime travel agent tried to select an aisle seat, which is more comfortable for Mr. Nader. Probably for whoever might be next to him, too.


The seating chart showed dozens of open aisle seats. But he couldn't book any of them. An airline agent said those seats were being held for preferred economy class ticket holders. One might still be open by flight time. One might not.

The agent said Mr. Nader could only be sure to get an aisle seat if he changed his booking to a last minute, full-fare ticket which cost $2,680. That's to get to Dallas in economy, by the way. Not Abu Dhabi in first class.

"I knew that it might be $50 more for aisle seats," Mr. Nader was quoted as saying on Twitter. "But ... it's extortion. They are charging you for knee lengths."


The airline says they simply hold back seats for their most frequent fliers. Mr. Nader says he prefers to fly another airline, but only American goes between Hartford and Dallas.


"The computer tells them there is no competition," he complained, "and they pull back all the aisle seats looking for money."I am a little astonished that in these times when airline agents can practically see your DNA profile onscreen, there's not a popup to instruct them in huge bold letters, "GIVE RALPH NADER WHATEVER HE WANTS AND SAVE US ALL A LOT OF TROUBLE."


Mr. Nader once sued an airline agent for bumping him from a flight. Eight years later, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in his favor to create the rule that compensates bumped passengers.


American gave Mr. Nader an aisle seat as a good-will gesture. Mr. Nader says he told the customer service representative, "You've fixed my problem, but you haven't fixed the overall problem."


Of course, where some see overall problems, airlines see revenue opportunities. Many families have discovered they're no longer seated together, as a matter of common sense and courtesy, because airlines have learned they can sell adjoining seats for small fees.


But if there's some kind of problem in the air, do airlines really want children unable to reach their parents?


People don't mind paying extra for extra service. But what's the price of plain decency?

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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