Ruthie Foster: Texas Gospel With A Worldly Touch | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio
Filed Under:

Ruthie Foster: Texas Gospel With A Worldly Touch

Ruthie Foster is from a small town in central Texas — but there's nothing small about the way she sings on her new album, Let It Burn. Zigzagging between blues, soul, gospel and rock, the album features solid originals and surprising covers, along with several stirring collaborations with The Blind Boys of Alabama.

Foster herself has followed a winding path in her career, including a tour of duty with the U.S. Navy Band and a stint in New York City, where she briefly had a contract with Atlantic Records.

"New York was a great experience. I try to say yes to opportunity, and it was an opportunity to be a songwriter," she says. "I learned a lot about different ways to write a song, how to keep an audience, how to keep people from walking out. I can say I walked away a better musician."

Ultimately, Foster left New York and returned to Texas, this time settling in the musical mecca of Austin.

I decided I needed to go back to my home base and write about the things that I know," she says. "That's when my music started to really change."

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Peru's Pitmasters Bury Their Meat In The Earth, Inca-Style

Step up your summer grilling game by re-creating the ancient Peruvian way of cooking meat underground in your own backyard. It's called pachamanca, and it yields incredibly moist and smoky morsels.
NPR

Peru's Pitmasters Bury Their Meat In The Earth, Inca-Style

Step up your summer grilling game by re-creating the ancient Peruvian way of cooking meat underground in your own backyard. It's called pachamanca, and it yields incredibly moist and smoky morsels.
NPR

Jeb Bush's Wealth Skyrocketed After Leaving Governor's Office

Thirty-three years of tax returns — the most ever for a presidential candidate — show Bush earned $29 million since leaving office. He also paid an average tax rate of 36 percent over three decades.
NPR

Flood Maps Can Get Much Sharper With A Little Supercomputing Oomph

Entrepreneurs are turning to Oak Ridge National Lab's supercomputer to make all sorts of things, including maps that are much more accurate in predicting how a neighborhood will fare in a flood.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.