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Olof Arnalds: An Icelandic Take On Heartland Rock

Ólöf Arnalds was born and raised in Iceland, and has been part of its experimental rock scene for years. That's what makes her new EP, Ólöf Sings, so surprising: It's a collection of English-language covers — songs originally performed by Bruce Springsteen, Bob Dylan and Neil Diamond.

Arnalds tells Weekend Edition Saturday's Scott Simon that she got interested in rock and pop during her childhood, after some unsatisfying years training as a classical violinist.

"I had a really hard time learning notation," Arnalds says. "I had been learning violin for three years when they discovered that I didn't read notes — I was just very good at following. And then I started teaching myself guitar as a teenager, which was a little bit to make up for all those horrible years of learning violin.

"That was very important for me, because nobody could tell me how to approach the instrument or how to understand what I was doing," she adds. "I could just go from my own inner understanding of music."

Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Barbershop: UofL Basketball Ban, Football Concussions And The NFL Women's Summit

ESPN contributor Kevin Blackistone, Bloomberg View's Kavitha Davidson and The Washington Post's Wesley Lowery talk about the UofL basketball team, public opinion of the NFL, and women in sports.
NPR

After Introducing Changes, Keurig Sales Continue To Fall

Despite America's high coffee consumption, Keurig reported disappointing sales this week. Even during its popular holiday selling period, the numbers haven't perked up in recent years.
NPR

On The Clock: Who's Getting The Most Talking Time In Tonight's Debate

It's the last debate before the New Hampshire primary and Donald Trump is back onstage. Which GOP candidate will end up with the most talking time?
NPR

How Limited Internet Access Can Subtract From Kids' Education

Smartphones are often credited with helping bridge the "digital divide" between people who do and don't have Internet access at home. But is mobile Internet enough for a family with a kid in school?

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