Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me! | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!

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NPR’sWait Wait…Don’t Tell Me! takes a fast-paced, irreverent look at the news of the world—and the weird. Now in its sixth year, the show offers a modern and sometimes raucous twist on the old-time radio quiz show, mining NPR news stories for quiz questions. The host is Peter Sagal, who is an award-winning playwright and father of three in his spare time. America’s favorite newscaster, NPR’s Carl Kasell, is the show’s official judge and scorekeeper.

Each week, Sagal quizzes the panelists and listeners to determine just how closely they paid attention to the week's news. He serves up questions in all forms: lightning rounds, tape from NPR news shows, multiple choice, identify the “fake” story and fill-in-the-blank limericks. Listeners call 888-WAIT-WAIT for a chance to win the most coveted prize in all of public radio: a custom-recorded greeting by Carl Kasell for their home’s answering machine or voice mail.


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Stephen Hawking Says Zayn Malik Could Still Be In One Direction In A Parallel Universe

Millions of hearts were broken last month when Zayn Malik left One Direction, but according to physicist Stephen Hawking, that might not be the case after all.
NPR

Competitive Bartender Pours Father's Wisdom Into Signature Drink

Bartender Ran Duan will represent the U.S. in a Bacardi international cocktail competition. His specialty? "Father's Advice," a stirred-not-shaken cocktail that's a testament to his hardworking dad.
NPR

3 Reasons Republicans Might Cheer A Pro-Gay-Marriage Ruling

The Supreme Court hears arguments on same-sex-marriage bans Tuesday. And even though Republicans are the traditional-marriage party, they just could welcome a pro-same-sex marriage ruling.
NPR

Google Experimenting With Patent Marketplace To Combat Trolls

Google will allow patent holders to "tell Google about patents they're willing to sell at a price they set." Tech firms have been targeted by "trolls" who own patents and charge them licensing fees.