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Actor Henry Winkler Plays Not My Job

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For kids growing up in the 1970s, there was one, absolute model of cool — not James Dean or Marlon Brando, but The Fonz. Henry Winkler played the 1950s greaser on the sitcom Happy Days who got all the girls, and even more amazingly, could make the vending machine spit out free sodas with his fist.

Winkler joins us to play a game called "Ayyyyyy ... you took all my money!" A Fonzie scheme would involve helping others through coolness and jumping sharks. A Ponzi scheme is something else altogether. Winkler answers three questions about Ponzi schemes.

Originally broadcast on Sept. 10, 2011.

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