Not My Job: 'Family Guy' Creator Seth MacFarlane | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio
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Not My Job: 'Family Guy' Creator Seth MacFarlane

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Some years ago, Seth MacFarlane was a student at the Rhode Island School of Design, where, for his thesis, he made an animated film about a rather peculiar New England family. That eventually became the TV series Family Guy, which MacFarlane produces, writes and voices many of the characters. He's also the creator of American Dad! and The Cleveland Show --- and even has a new album called Music Is Better Than Words, in which he sings classic American show tunes.

We've invited MacFarlane to play a game called "Five hours in the slammer will change a man." On Sunday, Lindsay Lohan began a 30-day jail sentence that ended just five hours later. It turns out that celebrity felons get treated differently than you and me, at least according to an article in Prison Legal News by Matt Clarke called Prison Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous. MacFarlane answers three questions about celebrities in the big house.

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