WAMU 88.5 :

Cleveland, OH -- Entrepeneurs at Work

Cleveland, Ohio is a city that was made by entrepreneurs, but for decades, it’s been known as a city that’s a shell of its former manufacturing-era glorious self. However, Cleveland is being embraced by a new generation of entrepreneurs as a place to put their dreams in motion. This is a now a city of entrepreneurship in a range of incarnations in their kids’ education, in the environment, even in beer. This is an hour of entrepreneurial stories, taking a look at that go-get-em-seize-your-dreams energy in a variety of forms.

Segment A
We begin the hour with an introduction to Cleveland’s illustrious entrepreneurial history. Then an innovative idea for old, empty warehouses and factories.

Segment B
The fall, the fund of funds, and the future for Cleveland. Then, how laundry can mean a lot more than just dirty clothes getting clean. Later one man’s incredible find on a factory floor, and then we hear a letter from a Cleveland resident.

Segment C
From the burning Cuyahoga River to bringing the river back. What groups are doing to restore the river. Then, transforming a neighborhood… with beer. And the incredible determination of a group of parents concerned about their children’s education. Finally, we hear from Cleveland residents about the changing entrepreneurial culture in their city.

NPR

Jack Davis, Cartoonist Who Helped Found 'Mad' Magazine, Dies

Money from a job illustrating a Coca-Cola training manual became a springboard for Jack Davis to move from Georgia to New York.
NPR

Cookie Dough Blues: How E. Coli Is Sneaking Into Our Forbidden Snack

Most people know not to eat raw cookie dough. But now it's serious: 46 people have now been sickened with E. coli-tainted flour. Here's how contamination might be occurring.
WAMU 88.5

The Politics Hour – LIVE from Slim's Diner!

This special edition of the Politics Hour is coming to you live from Slim's Diner from Petworth in Northwest D.C.

NPR

Writing Data Onto Single Atoms, Scientists Store The Longest Text Yet

With atomic memory technology, little patterns of atoms can be arranged to represent English characters, fitting the content of more than a billion books onto the surface of a stamp.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.