Cleveland, OH -- Entrepeneurs at Work

Cleveland, Ohio is a city that was made by entrepreneurs, but for decades, it’s been known as a city that’s a shell of its former manufacturing-era glorious self. However, Cleveland is being embraced by a new generation of entrepreneurs as a place to put their dreams in motion. This is a now a city of entrepreneurship in a range of incarnations in their kids’ education, in the environment, even in beer. This is an hour of entrepreneurial stories, taking a look at that go-get-em-seize-your-dreams energy in a variety of forms.

Segment A
We begin the hour with an introduction to Cleveland’s illustrious entrepreneurial history. Then an innovative idea for old, empty warehouses and factories.

Segment B
The fall, the fund of funds, and the future for Cleveland. Then, how laundry can mean a lot more than just dirty clothes getting clean. Later one man’s incredible find on a factory floor, and then we hear a letter from a Cleveland resident.

Segment C
From the burning Cuyahoga River to bringing the river back. What groups are doing to restore the river. Then, transforming a neighborhood… with beer. And the incredible determination of a group of parents concerned about their children’s education. Finally, we hear from Cleveland residents about the changing entrepreneurial culture in their city.

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