Brooklyn, NY -- Change Happens | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

Brooklyn, NY -- Change Happens

Brooklyn is New York's most populous borough, and it's ever evolving. From a bastion of industry, to a refuge for immigrants from around the world, and now, in parts at least, to high rises condos and gentrification. This episode of SOTRU charts Brooklyn's evolution, and celebrates the diverse communities and community gathering spots of many of its residents.

Segment A
Atlantic Yards is the biggest development project in the history of Brooklyn. Although not yet built yet, it is and will continue to alter the chemistry of the neighborhood in which it is being built.

Segment B
Enjoy a whimsical history of the Brooklyn borough from New York’s first family of tour guides. Then we drop in on three diverse gathering spots and end up at a boxing gym where athletes are strengthening more than just their bodies.

Segment C
Explore the culture of memorial murals and the mourning, memories, death, life, friends, family and art that goes along with them. Then, we sit down with Brooklyn-born and bred rapper, singer and songwriter John Forte to discuss his reinvention.

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