The Lee Michael Demsey Show

Schedule
88.5-2
Monday - Friday
3:00 am
Monday - Friday
3:00 pm

Lee has hosted bluegrass programs on WAMU 88.5's airwaves for 25 years. He continues his tradition of spinning contemporary bluegrass for you, LIVE in the studio, each weekday from 10am to Noon, with artist interviews and your requests. He also hosts a program on Saturdays 11a to 2p, focusing in on the great singer/songwriters in bluegrass and acoustic music.

In 1975 Lee joined WAMU 88.5 as the host of Rock n' Roll Jukebox, a heavy metal and progressive rock show. Rock n' Roll Jukebox was the second most listened to show on the station at the time, behind Saturday Morning Bluegrass. In 1991, he was honored with the Broadcaster of the Year award from the IBMA. Currently Lee compiles the monthly bluegrass charts for Bluegrass Unlimited.

In Lee's own words… "Through the many years I’ve been involved in radio, my greatest joy comes in sharing music with the listener, [music] that might be full of joy or might bring a tear to your eye, [music] that features an amazing vocalist or a gifted group of instrumentalists. Though there's always a lot to be said for the tried and true bluegrass music, it's always a great pleasure to introduce you to a new artist or a new song."


WAMU 88.5

Remains In Jamestown Linked To Early Colonial Leaders

Scientists from the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History and The Jamestown Rediscovery Foundation say they've identified four men buried in the earliest English church in America.
NPR

Me-Tea-Morphosis: Tea Bags Get Second Life As Works Of Art

Artists are reinventing the humble tea bag, letting its contents and simple shape and color shine in beautiful, fragile art. Some are even farming out the tea drinking to get to the used bags.
NPR

President Obama Addresses African Union In Ethiopia

President Obama addressed the African Union in Ethiopia on Tuesday, becoming the first sitting U.S. president to do so. He encouraged African leaders to end political corruption.
NPR

Researchers Warn Against 'Autonomous Weapons' Arms Race

Already, researcher Stuart Russell says, sentry robots in South Korea "can spot and track a human being for a distance of two miles – and can very accurately kill that person."