The Lee Michael Demsey Show

Schedule
88.5-2
Monday - Friday
3:00 am
Monday - Friday
3:00 pm

Lee has hosted bluegrass programs on WAMU 88.5's airwaves for 25 years. He continues his tradition of spinning contemporary bluegrass for you, LIVE in the studio, each weekday from 10am to Noon, with artist interviews and your requests. He also hosts a program on Saturdays 11a to 2p, focusing in on the great singer/songwriters in bluegrass and acoustic music.

In 1975 Lee joined WAMU 88.5 as the host of Rock n' Roll Jukebox, a heavy metal and progressive rock show. Rock n' Roll Jukebox was the second most listened to show on the station at the time, behind Saturday Morning Bluegrass. In 1991, he was honored with the Broadcaster of the Year award from the IBMA. Currently Lee compiles the monthly bluegrass charts for Bluegrass Unlimited.

In Lee's own words… "Through the many years I’ve been involved in radio, my greatest joy comes in sharing music with the listener, [music] that might be full of joy or might bring a tear to your eye, [music] that features an amazing vocalist or a gifted group of instrumentalists. Though there's always a lot to be said for the tried and true bluegrass music, it's always a great pleasure to introduce you to a new artist or a new song."


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