The Politics Hour - August 22, 2014 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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The Politics Hour - August 22, 2014

Virginia's former governor takes the stand to defend himself in a high-profile corruption trial. The Internal Revenue Service inserts itself into the brewing controversy of an affordable housing complex in the District. And Maryland officials pledge that its troubled online health exchange will be fixed by November. Join us for our weekly review of the politics, policies, and personalities of the District of Columbia, Maryland and Virginia.

Should Local Police Officers Wear Cameras?

In light of the shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, Angela Alsobrooks, the State's Attorney for Prince George's County, Maryland, said having police officers wear cameras would help better protect them during investigations.

"Officers' use of technology has been very helpful," she said of other tools, like dashboard cameras, departments have put in place. "It really does alleviate questions that may arise later."

Watch the discussion below.

Watch Full Video

Watch the full interview with Angela Alsobrooks, the State's Attorney for Prince George's County, Maryland, in our studio.

NPR

MacArthur Fellow Terrance Hayes: Poems Are Music, Language Our Instrument

Hayes, a professor of writing at the University of Pittsburgh, was recognized for "reflecting on race, gender, and family in works that seamlessly encompass both the historical and the personal."
NPR

Diet Soda May Alter Our Gut Microbes And The Risk Of Diabetes

There's a new wrinkle to the old debate over diet soda: Artificial sweeteners may alter our microbiomes. And for some, this may raise blood sugar levels and set the stage for diabetes.
NPR

House Passes Bill That Authorizes Arming Syrian Rebels

Even though it was backed by both party leaders, the vote split politicians within their own ranks. The final tally on the narrow military measure was 273 to 156.
NPR

3.7 Million Comments Later, Here's Where Net Neutrality Stands

A proposal about how to maintain unfettered access to Internet content drew a bigger public response than any single issue in the Federal Communication Commission's history. What's next?

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