WAMU 88.5 : The Kojo Nnamdi Show

"The Mockingbird Next Door: Life with Harper Lee"

Harper Lee's 1960 novel "To Kill a Mockingbird" has sold more than 40 million copies in 18 languages. Lee is also one of the publishing world's greatest mysteries: after initial publicity tours and buzz about a second book, she withdrew from public life and hasn't published another novel. Journalist Marja Mills, who gained unprecedented access to Lee and her family, joins us to shed some light on the life of one of America's literary icons as questions about whether or not Lee was a willing participant in the project swirl.

Atticus's Closing Statement - To Kill a Mockingbird

Harper Lee's famous book was made into a film in 1962. In this scene, actor Gregory Peck portrays lawyer Atticus Finch's closing argument in court.

Read A Featured Excerpt

Prologue reprinted by arrangement with Penguin Press, a member of Penguin Group (USA) LLC, A Penguin Random House Company. Copyright © Marja Mills, 2014.

The Mockingbird Next Door: Life with Harper Lee

NPR

The Art Of MacGyvering For Sleep-Deprived Moms And Dads

New parents need all the help they can get. Author and mom of two Asha Dornfest has compiled a book of 134 handy hacks for parents. That roll of blue painter's tape? A "magical multitasker," she says.
NPR

When It Came To Food, Neanderthals Weren't Exactly Picky Eaters

During the Ice Age, it seems Neanderthals tended to chow down on whatever was most readily available. Early humans, on the other hand, maintained a consistent diet regardless of environmental changes.
NPR

Donald Trump Delivers Keynote At California GOP Convention

Donald Trump gave the keynote address Friday afternoon at the California Republican convention. He's trying to lock-up the party's presidential nomination, and California could put him over the top.
NPR

Apple's Lousy Week Could Signal Times Of Trouble For Tech Giant

Apple got hit with a lot of bad news this week. First, the company posted its first quarterly revenue drop since 2003. And then billionaire activist investor Carl Icahn revealed that he has dumped all of his shares in Apple. NPR explores whether the company is really in trouble or if is this all just a bump in the road.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.