WAMU 88.5 : The Kojo Nnamdi Show

Bill Nye "The Science Guy" (Rebroadcast)

Twenty years ago, Bill Nye introduced a generation of young people to the wonders of natural science in his weekly television show, “Bill Nye The Science Guy.” Today, his lively, and at times comedic, style of explaining scientific facts remains an example for educators looking to engage kids in scientific studies. Bill Nye, a Washington native, joins Kojo to discuss how he got hooked on science and what he thinks can draw future generations into STEM fields.

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Bill Nye, the former host of the popular television program "Bill Nye: The Science Guy," said Wednesday he didn't think his stance on creationism affected his ability to educate young scientists.

"Climate change should not be a political issue. Evolution should not be a political issue," he told host Kojo Nnamdi during his hour-long appearance on the Kojo Nnamdi show.

"I believe that ultimately in as little as five years ... this striking, thoughtless way of thinking - worldview- will be discredited to a greater extent," he said.

For the full discussion, watch the video below

Watch Bill Nye's Full Hour In Studio

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In this video clip from "Bill Nye The Science Guy," Nye makes his own volcano.

WAMU 88.5

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NPR

Evaporated Cane Juice? Puh-leeze. Just Call It Sugar, FDA Says

Companies cultivating a healthful image often list "evaporated cane juice" in their products' ingredients. But the FDA says it's really just sugar, and that's what food labels should call it.
WAMU 88.5

The Politics Hour - May 27, 2016

Congress votes to override DC's 2013 ballot initiative on budget autonomy. Virginia governor faces a federal investigation over international finance and lobbying rules. And DC, Maryland and Virginia move to create a Metro safety oversight panel.

NPR

With Shuttles Gone, Private Ventures Give Florida's Space Coast A Lift

Five years after NASA's shuttle program ended, a new Florida aerospace industry is beginning to take shape. Firms, from those making jets to tiny Internet satellites, are adding factories and jobs.

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