Shaping the City: Designing for Disaster | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Shaping the City: Designing for Disaster

When the I-35W bridge in Minneapolis buckled during rush-hour in August 2007, the collapse underscored how faulty infrastructure can bring disaster to communities in an instant. Though some communities are able to prepare for -- and mitigate -- disaster from rusted steel and even forces of nature, others struggle to update structures that remain vulnerable to time and the elements. We talk with architect Roger Lewis and National Building Museum curator Chrysanthe Broikos about how designers and engineers are finding new ways to build aesthetically pleasing, disaster-resilient structures amid changing weather patterns and building codes.

Featured Clip: "Wall Of Wind" Explores How To Build For Disaster

"Designing for Disaster," the National Building Museum's newest exhibit, explores the latest innovation and research around trying to build communities that are safer from natural disasters.

For a look behind the scenes of the exhibit, including a "Wall of Wind" built by Florida International University, watch this video with museum curator Chrysanthe Broikos.

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