Glenn Greenwald: State Surveillance And The Snowden Story | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Glenn Greenwald: State Surveillance And The Snowden Story

Nearly a year ago, the world learned the name Edward Snowden, and with it, information about a vast surveillance network run by the U.S. government. For Glenn Greenwald, the journalist who broke the stories based on Snowden’s stolen documents, the revelations represented a high point in a career devoted to exposing government overreach. Today, Snowden remains a fugitive, but debate over state secrecy, privacy and the rights of whistleblowers dominates headlines. Kojo sits down with Greenwald to talk about his role in this story, what more there is to learn, and the impact of his reporting on state security.

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Most of the National Security Agency (NSA) programs Edward Snowden's documents revealed are "definitely" still in use, says Glenn Greenwald, the investigative journalist who first broke the story about the vast surveillance network run by the U.S. government.

While President Barack Obama has spoken out about changing how the government uses personal data, not much has changed within the NSA since Snowden's documents were released, Greenwald said Wednesday on the Kojo Nnamdi show.

Among those programs: Xkeyscore, which gives any NSA analyst direct, real-time access to all of the emails linked to a given personal email address.

Watch Greenwald discuss the programs below.

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Watch the full interview with Glenn Greenwald in our studio.

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NO PLACE TO HIDE: Edward Snowden, the NSA, and the U.S. Surveillance State by Glenn Greenwald. Copyright © 2014 by Glenn Greenwald. Reprinted by arrangement with Metropolitan Books, an imprint of Henry Holt and Company LLC.

No Place to Hide

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