WAMU 88.5 : The Kojo Nnamdi Show

Computer Guys and Gal

Twitter gets a makeover to look more like Facebook. A White House report says Internet companies shouldn't snoop on their own users to send them targeted ads. And documentary filmmakers uncover a long-rumored cache of unopened Atari games, which were apparently buried in a landfill for 30 years. The Computer Guys and Gal are here to discuss the latest in the tech world.

Apps Of The Month

Chi Bingo is an app that aims to increase social activity at conferences. The idea is simple: Before the conference, enter nine names of people with whom you want to interact. Then the race is on to get "selfies" with each of them before the week ends. Once you're done you can share your 9x9 grid with others! Researchers at the FIT Lab in Swansea University developed the app, in honor of the late Gary Marsden, an HCI mobile researcher.

For "jet setters" like Kojo and Allison, there's a new app called Gate Guru

Make video games with a pencil and paper using Pixel Press. Draw your level designs on graph paper and scan them into your iPad to make them come to life. Pixel Press Floors allows you to make platformer video games (think Super Mario Bros).

NPR

Not My Job: We Quiz Lena Headey On Games Worse Than 'Game Of Thrones'

Game of Thrones may have killed off many major characters, but the manipulative, scheming Queen Cersei is still standing. We've invited Headey to play a game called "You win and you die."
NPR

After Introducing Changes, Keurig Sales Continue To Fall

Despite America's high coffee consumption, Keurig reported disappointing sales this week. Even during its popular holiday selling period, the numbers haven't perked up in recent years.
NPR

Do Political TV Ads Still Work?

TV ads are a tried-and-true way for politicians to get their message out. But in this chaotic presidential primary, are they still effective?
NPR

Twitter Says It Has Shut Down 125,000 Terrorism-Related Accounts

The announcement comes just weeks after a woman sued Twitter, saying the platform knowingly let ISIS use the network "to spread propaganda, raise money and attract recruits."

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