Computer Guys and Gal | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Computer Guys and Gal

Twitter gets a makeover to look more like Facebook. A White House report says Internet companies shouldn't snoop on their own users to send them targeted ads. And documentary filmmakers uncover a long-rumored cache of unopened Atari games, which were apparently buried in a landfill for 30 years. The Computer Guys and Gal are here to discuss the latest in the tech world.

Apps Of The Month

Chi Bingo is an app that aims to increase social activity at conferences. The idea is simple: Before the conference, enter nine names of people with whom you want to interact. Then the race is on to get "selfies" with each of them before the week ends. Once you're done you can share your 9x9 grid with others! Researchers at the FIT Lab in Swansea University developed the app, in honor of the late Gary Marsden, an HCI mobile researcher.

For "jet setters" like Kojo and Allison, there's a new app called Gate Guru

Make video games with a pencil and paper using Pixel Press. Draw your level designs on graph paper and scan them into your iPad to make them come to life. Pixel Press Floors allows you to make platformer video games (think Super Mario Bros).

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Audiences Get A Modern Look At A 19th Century Opera

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Can You Trust That Organic Label On Imported Food?

A new book claims the organic label can't be trusted, especially on food that's imported. Yet there is a global system for verifying the authenticity of organic food, and it mostly seems to work.
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Democrats Make New Bid To Require Donor Transparency

The latest version of the DISCLOSE Act, which would force donor disclosure on outside organizations that engage in election politics, is facing now-familiar opposition from Republican lawmakers.
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A Plan To Untangle Our Digital Lives After We're Gone

In the digital age, our online accounts don't die with us. A proposed law might determine what does happen to them. But the tech industry warns the measure could threaten the privacy of the deceased.

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