WAMU 88.5 : The Kojo Nnamdi Show

The Computer Guys And Gal

Facebook is venturing into virtual reality with its $2 billion purchase of start-up Oculus -- to the dismay of some who supported the young company through Kickstarter. Microsoft is crossing the line into Apple territory with its new Office for iPad. And techies prove to be some of the best April Fool's Day pranksters around. The Computer Guys and Gal are here to explain.

Apps Of The Month

Garden Tracker lets you plan your spring garden by choosing garden plots from a grid that you design. From there, track your plants' growth progress and enter details such as days to harvest, days since watered and days since last fertilized.

To help your spring cleaning, Rumgr acts as a virtual garage sale. It browses the garages of people in your area without you having to wander around in a car.

Is spring break on your mind? Field Tripper identifies interesting sites that are within walking distance.

Because you can’t have big data with mundane data collection, Salesforce lets you import, export and delete an unlimited amount of data.

What Facebook Might Look Like Using Oculus Rift

Google Maps Pokémon Challenge

NPR

Barbershop: UofL Basketball Ban, Football Concussions And The NFL Women's Summit

ESPN contributor Kevin Blackistone, Bloomberg View's Kavitha Davidson and The Washington Post's Wesley Lowery talk about the UofL basketball team, public opinion of the NFL, and women in sports.
NPR

After Introducing Changes, Keurig Sales Continue To Fall

Despite America's high coffee consumption, Keurig reported disappointing sales this week. Even during its popular holiday selling period, the numbers haven't perked up in recent years.
NPR

With A Little Help From Larry David, Bernie Sanders Does SNL

Bernie Sanders impersonator Larry David hosted the episode with a cameo from the senator himself. Sanders slipped in a main campaign message, while David jabbed at the candidate's cantankerous side.
NPR

How Limited Internet Access Can Subtract From Kids' Education

Smartphones are often credited with helping bridge the "digital divide" between people who do and don't have Internet access at home. But is mobile Internet enough for a family with a kid in school?

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