WAMU 88.5 : The Kojo Nnamdi Show

The Computer Guys And Gal

Facebook is venturing into virtual reality with its $2 billion purchase of start-up Oculus -- to the dismay of some who supported the young company through Kickstarter. Microsoft is crossing the line into Apple territory with its new Office for iPad. And techies prove to be some of the best April Fool's Day pranksters around. The Computer Guys and Gal are here to explain.

Apps Of The Month

Garden Tracker lets you plan your spring garden by choosing garden plots from a grid that you design. From there, track your plants' growth progress and enter details such as days to harvest, days since watered and days since last fertilized.

To help your spring cleaning, Rumgr acts as a virtual garage sale. It browses the garages of people in your area without you having to wander around in a car.

Is spring break on your mind? Field Tripper identifies interesting sites that are within walking distance.

Because you can’t have big data with mundane data collection, Salesforce lets you import, export and delete an unlimited amount of data.

What Facebook Might Look Like Using Oculus Rift

Google Maps Pokémon Challenge

NPR

A Compelling Plot Gives Way To Farce In Franzen's Purity

The new novel reveals sharp observations and a great, sprawling story. But critic Roxane Gay says the book gets bogged down with absurdly-drawn characters and misfired critiques of modern life.
NPR

Huge Fish Farm Planned Near San Diego Aims To Fix Seafood Imbalance

The aquaculture project would be the same size as New York's Central Park and produce 11 million pounds of yellowtail and sea bass each year. But some people see it as an aquatic "factory farm."
NPR

CNN Just Found A Way To Get Carly Fiorina Onto The Debate Stage

The former Hewlett-Packard CEO had been fighting CNN's criteria for the September presidential candidates debate. Now, she might get her way and make it into the network's main event.
NPR

How Startups Are Using Tech To Mitigate Workplace Bias

The idea that everyone makes automatic, subconscious associations about people is not new. But now some companies are trying to reduce the impact of such biases in the workplace.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.