WAMU 88.5 : The Kojo Nnamdi Show

The Computer Guys And Gal

Facebook is venturing into virtual reality with its $2 billion purchase of start-up Oculus -- to the dismay of some who supported the young company through Kickstarter. Microsoft is crossing the line into Apple territory with its new Office for iPad. And techies prove to be some of the best April Fool's Day pranksters around. The Computer Guys and Gal are here to explain.

Apps Of The Month

Garden Tracker lets you plan your spring garden by choosing garden plots from a grid that you design. From there, track your plants' growth progress and enter details such as days to harvest, days since watered and days since last fertilized.

To help your spring cleaning, Rumgr acts as a virtual garage sale. It browses the garages of people in your area without you having to wander around in a car.

Is spring break on your mind? Field Tripper identifies interesting sites that are within walking distance.

Because you can’t have big data with mundane data collection, Salesforce lets you import, export and delete an unlimited amount of data.

What Facebook Might Look Like Using Oculus Rift

Google Maps Pokémon Challenge

WAMU 88.5

Baltimore Artist Joyce J. Scott Pushes Local, Global Boundaries

The MacArthur Foundation named 67-year-old Baltimore artist Joyce J. Scott a 2016 Fellow -– an honor that comes with a $625,000 "genius grant" and international recognition.


A History Of Election Cake And Why Bakers Want To #MakeAmericaCakeAgain

Bakers Susannah Gebhart and Maia Surdam are reviving election cake: a boozy, dense fruitcake that was a way for women to participate in the democratic process before they had the right to vote.

So, Which Is It: Bigly Or Big-League? Linguists Take On A Common Trumpism

If you've followed the 2016 presidential election, you've probably heard Donald Trump say it: "bigly." Or is that "big-league"? We asked linguists settle the score — and offer a little context, too.
WAMU 88.5

Twilight Warriors: The Soldiers, Spies And Special Agents Who Are Revolutionizing The American Way Of War

After the 9/11 attacks, U.S. intelligence, military and law enforcement agencies were forced to work together in completely new ways. A veteran national security reporter on how America has tried to adapt to a new era of warfare.

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