WAMU 88.5 : The Kojo Nnamdi Show

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Robin Givhan On Conscious Consumerism

In an age of "fast fashion," the path our clothes take from factory to closet is often far from shoppers' minds. But a growing number of clothing companies are putting both mission-driven ethics and profit front and center. Almost a year after a factory collapse in Bangladesh made some consumers more concerned about where their clothing comes from, we consider the ideas and realities that fuel consumer clothing choices.

From The Frontlines Of Conscious Consumerism

Serawit "Cherry" Friedmeyer on Ellilta Women at Risk and Ellilta Products.

From Ethiopia To Your Closet, Tracing The Origins Of A Scarf

The Art Of Handwoven Traditional Scarves

When the Kojo Show team traveled to Ethiopia earlier this year, they spent time with women in Addis Ababa who weave products that make their way around the world. The work is part of a program run by Ellilta to create more economic opportunities for women who are trying to leave the country's sex trade. Here, a woman weaves colorful fabric into a scarf that will be sold by fashionABLE, a nonprofit that creates sustainable business in Africa.

(Michael Martinez/WAMU 88.5)

Making Scarves -- And Opportunities -- On The Weaving Loom

From spool to scarf, walk through the process of weaving and dying fabric into a product that simultaneously can be sold for a profit while empowering local women.

WAMU 88.5

Introducing Capital Soundtrack, A New WAMU Music Project

What does Washington sound like? Capital Soundtrack, a new music project from WAMU 88.5, explores that question.
NPR

Evaporated Cane Juice? Puh-leeze. Just Call It Sugar, FDA Says

Companies cultivating a healthful image often list "evaporated cane juice" in their products' ingredients. But the FDA says it's really just sugar, and that's what food labels should call it.
WAMU 88.5

The Politics Hour - May 27, 2016

Congress votes to override DC's 2013 ballot initiative on budget autonomy. Virginia governor faces a federal investigation over international finance and lobbying rules. And DC, Maryland and Virginia move to create a Metro safety oversight panel.

NPR

After Departure Of Uber, Lyft In Austin, New Companies Enter The Void

Earlier this month, voters in Austin, Texas, rejected an effort to overturn the city's rules for ride-hailing companies. Uber and Lyft tried to prevent fingerprinting of their drivers, and now both have left town. A few other ride-share companies have popped up to help fill the void. NPR explores how people are getting around town without Uber and Lyft.

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