WAMU 88.5 : The Kojo Nnamdi Show

DC Water Proposes Green Infrastructure

The District's water agency is drilling a huge tunnel under sections of the Potomac and Anacostia Rivers through an agreement to end sewer overflow into the rivers. Now DC Water wants to use green infrastructure -- like permeable-pavement bike lanes and rain gardens -- to reduce the need for two more tunnels farther up the Potomac. But some environmentalists are reluctant to give up the tunnels--and their promise of clean rivers--without proof green infrastructure works. Kojo explores the proposal to trade "gray" tunnels for "green" solutions.

Visiting The First Lady Of Clean Rivers

Under the terms of a federally mandated consent decree, DC Water is implementing the $2.6 billion Clean Rivers Project. The first phase of the project is underway and involves constructing a massive underground tunnel system to control combined sewer overflows into the Anacostia River. In this video, DC Water General Manager George Hawkins visits the project's first tunnel boring machine, Lady Bird, on her subterranean job site.

Photo Gallery: Lady Bird In Progress

The Blue Plains Tunnel is beginning to take shape under the Potomac River. DC Water’s Tunnel Boring Machine, nicknamed Lady Bird, has mined about 1,100 feet so far from her launch pit at the Blue Plains Advanced Wastewater Treatment Plant. (All photos courtesy DC Water)

NPR

Jack Davis, Cartoonist Who Helped Found 'Mad' Magazine, Dies

Money from a job illustrating a Coca-Cola training manual became a springboard for Jack Davis to move from Georgia to New York.
NPR

Cookie Dough Blues: How E. Coli Is Sneaking Into Our Forbidden Snack

Most people know not to eat raw cookie dough. But now it's serious: 46 people have now been sickened with E. coli-tainted flour. Here's how contamination might be occurring.
WAMU 88.5

The Politics Hour – LIVE from Slim's Diner!

This special edition of the Politics Hour is coming to you live from Slim's Diner from Petworth in Northwest D.C.

NPR

Writing Data Onto Single Atoms, Scientists Store The Longest Text Yet

With atomic memory technology, little patterns of atoms can be arranged to represent English characters, fitting the content of more than a billion books onto the surface of a stamp.

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