WAMU 88.5 : The Kojo Nnamdi Show

Power Africa: Bridging Access To Electricity

Nearly two-thirds of the population of sub-Saharan Africa does not have access to electricity, and service is often unreliable for those who do. The Obama administration has pledged $7 billion to fund infrastructure projects in several African nations. As more companies look at locating in these developing countries, we consider the value of U.S. infrastructure investments.

Zemedeneh Negatu On U.S. Investment In African Infrastructure

During our visit to Ethiopia, Kojo interviewed Zemedeneh Negatu, managing partner for Ernst & Young in Ethiopia and head of transaction advisory services for Eastern Africa. Zem, as he's called for short, still maintains a home in the Washington region, even though he has returned to Ethiopia to work for EY. He talks about what EY does in Addis Ababa, from managing transactions by international investors to advising Ethiopians on setting up companies. Zem also explains why he encourages members of the American diaspora community to come to Addis and invest their talent in Ethiopia's economy.

Construction Projects Thrive In Addis Ababa

NPR

'Kids Love To Be Scared': Louis Sachar On Balancing Fun And Fear

The award-winning author of Holes has just published a new novel for young readers, called Fuzzy Mud. It mixes middle-school social puzzles with a more sinister mystery: a rogue biotech threat.
NPR

Confronting A Shortage Of Eggs, Bakers Get Creative With Replacements

Eggs are becoming more expensive and scarce recently because so many chickens have died from avian flu. So bakers, in particular, are looking for cheaper ingredients that can work just as well.
NPR

Jon Stewart's Private White House Meetings

Comedian Jon Stewart was called to the White House on at least two occasions for private meetings with President Obama, according to Politico. NPR's Arun Rath speaks with reporter Darren Samuelsohn.
NPR

An App Tells Painful Stories Of Slaves At Monticello's Mulberry Row

A new app uses geolocation to bring to life a lesser-known section of Thomas Jefferson's Virginia estate — Mulberry Row, which was the bustling enclave of skilled slaves who worked at Monticello.

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