Chinese New Year Food Traditions | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : The Kojo Nnamdi Show

Chinese New Year Food Traditions

The New Year, or Spring Festival, is the biggest holiday celebrated in Chinese culture. The celebration begins with the first full moon and lasts 15 days, and involves family meals, fireworks and gifts. Many of the traditional foods eaten at this time of year symbolize good fortune: eating uncut noodles means a long life, and dumplings resembling the shape of ancient Chinese coins suggest prosperity. We explore how the Chinese New Year is celebrated in communities around the world.

Sights And Sounds Of Chinese New Year

Thousands of people welcomed the Lunar New Year at the Chinese New Year parade in Washington’s Chinatown on Sunday, Feb. 2. According to the Chinese zodiac, 2014 is the Year of the Horse, symbolizing a capacity for work, independence, intelligence and friendliness. Chinese New Year celebrations traditionally include firecrackers, live musical performances with lion and dragon dancers, and feasts with foods like a whole fish and dumplings.

Filmed, edited and produced by WAMU 88.5 intern Yi Chen.

NPR

Halloween High Jinks For Fun And Nonprofits

Many Americans are not scared to reuse old clothes for new Halloween costumes.
NPR

A Wisecracking Biochemist Shares Her Kitchen ABCs

Shirley Corriher, author of Cookwise: The Hows and Whys of Successful Cooking, has tips on taking the bitter bite out of coffee, and holding onto cabbage's red hue while it's in the pan.
NPR

With Biden By His Side, Minnesota Democrat Mines For Blue-Collar Vote

Embattled Democrat Rep. Rick Nolan, who represents Minnesota's Iron Range, gets a campaign visit from the administration's blue-collar vote whisperer, Joe Biden.
NPR

Calling 911 On Your Cell? It's Harder To Find You Than You Think

If you call 911 from inside a tall building, emergency responders may have difficulty finding you. Cellphone GPS technology currently doesn't work well indoors — but the FCC hopes to change that.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.