WAMU 88.5 : The Kojo Nnamdi Show

Chinese New Year Food Traditions

The New Year, or Spring Festival, is the biggest holiday celebrated in Chinese culture. The celebration begins with the first full moon and lasts 15 days, and involves family meals, fireworks and gifts. Many of the traditional foods eaten at this time of year symbolize good fortune: eating uncut noodles means a long life, and dumplings resembling the shape of ancient Chinese coins suggest prosperity. We explore how the Chinese New Year is celebrated in communities around the world.

Sights And Sounds Of Chinese New Year

Thousands of people welcomed the Lunar New Year at the Chinese New Year parade in Washington’s Chinatown on Sunday, Feb. 2. According to the Chinese zodiac, 2014 is the Year of the Horse, symbolizing a capacity for work, independence, intelligence and friendliness. Chinese New Year celebrations traditionally include firecrackers, live musical performances with lion and dragon dancers, and feasts with foods like a whole fish and dumplings.

Filmed, edited and produced by WAMU 88.5 intern Yi Chen.

WAMU 88.5

Anne Tyler: "A Spool Of Blue Thread" (Rebroadcast)

In her first live radio interview ever, Pulitzer Prize winning author Anne Tyler joins Diane to talk about her 20th novel, "A Spool of Blue Thread."


Thanksgiving Buzz: What Would Pilgrims Say About The Plight Of Bees?

When you sit down for your holiday dinner, you may want to give thanks to bees and other pollinators. Their health is tied to your food. What's behind the bee declines? Watch our video investigation.

Reconsidering The Pilgrims, Piety And America's Founding Principles

Conservatives who want to emphasize America's Christian roots embrace the story of the Pilgrims and the Mayflower Compact. But some historians say their role in the country's founding is overstated.

From Takeout To Breakups: Apps Can Deliver Anything, For A Price

Convenience is at an all-time premium — and a lot of smartphone apps promise to make many of the things we do every day easier. In a time-crunch or sheer laziness, how far will the apps take us?

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.