WAMU 88.5 : The Kojo Nnamdi Show

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Understanding Your Taste Buds (Rebroadcast)

Do you know any picky eaters who can't stand certain foods? Genetics help shape our sense of taste and explain why we prefer bitter or sweet, like why we like coffee black or with sugar. We look at the range of individual tastes and how chefs and sommeliers account for them in perfecting a meal.

WAMU 88.5 Staff Take The Supertaster Test

Kojo Nnamdi Show listeners and WAMU 88.5 staff put their taste buds to the test to find out who's a supertaster and who's an average taster. Scroll down for a special video revealing whether Kojo is a supertaster.

One in four people is a supertaster, someone who's genetically predisposed to experience salty, sweet, bitter and sour flavors more intensely than the average person.

The test works by placing a strip of P.T.C. paper on your tongue. The ingredient in the paper, Phenylthiourea-Phenylthiocarbamide, is extremely bitter to a supertaster, who senses the bitterness within a micro-second, whereas an average or non-taster detects little to no bitterness.

Kojo Nnamdi Takes The Supertaster Test

Host Kojo Nnamdi discovers whether or not he has extra sensitive taste receptors.


'Washington Post' Reporter Explores How Pop Culture Influences Views Of Police

NPR's Kelly McEvers talks to Washington Post reporter Alyssa Rosenberg, who has written a series for the paper about how Hollywood and pop culture has influenced the way the public perceives police.

In 'Appetites,' Bourdain Pleases The Toughest Food Critic (His 9-Year-Old)

Anthony Bourdain's new cookbook features comfort food he cooks for his young daughter. "She's who I need to please, and if she's not happy, I'm not happy," he says.
WAMU 88.5

The Politics Hour - October 28, 2016

Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton joins us as the new series "Good Girls Revolt" based on her early civil rights work debuts.


Qualcomm Spends Big Money To Get In The Car (Chip) Business

The smartphone chipmaker has agreed to buy NXP Semiconductors for $38 billion. The deal allows Qualcomm to rely less on the smartphone industry. NXP makes semiconductors for cars.

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