Understanding Your Taste Buds (Rebroadcast) | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Understanding Your Taste Buds (Rebroadcast)

Do you know any picky eaters who can't stand certain foods? Genetics help shape our sense of taste and explain why we prefer bitter or sweet, like why we like coffee black or with sugar. We look at the range of individual tastes and how chefs and sommeliers account for them in perfecting a meal.

WAMU 88.5 Staff Take The Supertaster Test

Kojo Nnamdi Show listeners and WAMU 88.5 staff put their taste buds to the test to find out who's a supertaster and who's an average taster. Scroll down for a special video revealing whether Kojo is a supertaster.

One in four people is a supertaster, someone who's genetically predisposed to experience salty, sweet, bitter and sour flavors more intensely than the average person.

The test works by placing a strip of P.T.C. paper on your tongue. The ingredient in the paper, Phenylthiourea-Phenylthiocarbamide, is extremely bitter to a supertaster, who senses the bitterness within a micro-second, whereas an average or non-taster detects little to no bitterness.

Kojo Nnamdi Takes The Supertaster Test

Host Kojo Nnamdi discovers whether or not he has extra sensitive taste receptors.

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