WAMU 88.5 : The Kojo Nnamdi Show

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Understanding Your Taste Buds (Rebroadcast)

Do you know any picky eaters who can't stand certain foods? Genetics help shape our sense of taste and explain why we prefer bitter or sweet, like why we like coffee black or with sugar. We look at the range of individual tastes and how chefs and sommeliers account for them in perfecting a meal.

WAMU 88.5 Staff Take The Supertaster Test

Kojo Nnamdi Show listeners and WAMU 88.5 staff put their taste buds to the test to find out who's a supertaster and who's an average taster. Scroll down for a special video revealing whether Kojo is a supertaster.

One in four people is a supertaster, someone who's genetically predisposed to experience salty, sweet, bitter and sour flavors more intensely than the average person.

The test works by placing a strip of P.T.C. paper on your tongue. The ingredient in the paper, Phenylthiourea-Phenylthiocarbamide, is extremely bitter to a supertaster, who senses the bitterness within a micro-second, whereas an average or non-taster detects little to no bitterness.

Kojo Nnamdi Takes The Supertaster Test

Host Kojo Nnamdi discovers whether or not he has extra sensitive taste receptors.

NPR

At 75, Wonder Woman Lassos In A New Generation With An Ageless Fight

As the launch of the upcoming film coincides with the heroine's Comic-Con fandom, Wonder Woman appears to be hooking new fans for the same reasons she was birthed in 1941: justice, peace and feminism.
NPR

Japan's Lunchbox Trend 'Kyaraben' Takes Lunch Prep To Another Level

It's cute ... but is it too much cultural pressure?
NPR

Rallies, Marches And A 'Fart-In': Philadelphia Gets Ready For The DNC

As Democrats prepare for their convention in Philadelphia, protesters are preparing too. Bernie Sanders supporters and others are organizing rallies around the city.
NPR

The Reason Your Feed Became An Echo Chamber — And What To Do About It

It often feels as if social media serves less as a bridge than an echo chamber, with algorithms that feed us information we already know and like. So, how do you break that loop? We ask some experts.

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