WAMU 88.5 : The Kojo Nnamdi Show

The Politics Hour - Dec. 20, 2013

Rumors swirl about whether an indictment of Virginia Gov. Robert McDonnell is imminent. One of the region's longest-serving members of Congress announces plans to walk away from Capitol Hill. And problems with Maryland's health exchange continue to hound Gov. Martin O'Malley and Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown, who's campaigning hard for the state's top job next year. Join us for our weekly review of the politics, policies and personalities of the District of Columbia, Maryland and Virginia.

Featured Clip

D.C. Council Member David Catania said he will make his decision whether to run for mayor sometime before the April 1 primary. He said his decision would be a personal one, not based on the outcome of the primary. "[It will be] based on the conversations I'm having about whether or not through an honest self reflection if I'm the person that I believe is best suited to tackle the enduring issue of our city, which is a failed public education system," Catania said.

D.C. Council Member David Catania, a former Republican who now identifies as independent, talks about his relationship with the Republican party. "After years of being active in the Republican Party, and I have some friends on a personal level there, but I will have no organized assistance," he said.

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