WAMU 88.5 : The Kojo Nnamdi Show

Flory Jagoda And Trio Sefardi

For nearly nine decades, acclaimed singer and composer Flory Jagoda has passed along the colorful, soulful strains of Sephardic Jewish music to audiences worldwide. Considered the mother of Sephardic music and its ancient Ladino language, Jagoda’s influence has been felt from classrooms to concert halls, where she has been recognized as an important ambassador of a unique musical heritage. Kojo explores the sounds of Sephardic music with Jagoda and members of the music group, Trio Sefardi.

Flory Jagoda At The Library Of Congress

In celebration of Women's History Month, the Library presented a concert of Ladino music with Flory Jagoda in performance with Tiffani Ferrantelli and Zhenya Tochenaya.

Flory Jagoda Sings "A Espanya (To Spain)"

Jagoda performs the song, A Espanya (To Spain), at the Washington Folk Festival at Glen Echo, Sunday, June 5, 2011.

Flory Jagoda Performs "Ocho Kandelikas"

As part of the Boston Jewish Music Festival, Cantor Gastón joined Flory Jagoda and and members of Trio Sephardi in singing "Ocho Kandelikas," one of her best-known songs.

Rendition Of Flory Jagoda's "Ocho Kandelikas"

A fun interpretation of "Ocho Kandelikas" by a Connecticut children's choir.

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