The Politics Hour - Nov. 1, 2013 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : The Kojo Nnamdi Show

The Politics Hour - Nov. 1, 2013

Virginia candidates sprint to the finish with an election looming next week. A long-anticipated debate about redrawing school boundaries begins in the District. And "beach week" photos throw Maryland's gubernatorial race into the national spotlight. Join us for our weekly review of the politics, policies, and personalities of the District of Columbia, Maryland and Virginia.

Mayor Vincent Gray Proclaims 'Kojo Nnamdi Day'

D.C. Mayor Vincent Gray issued a proclamation declaring Nov. 1, 2013, as Kojo Nnamdi Day in the District of Columbia. The announcement celebrates Kojo's 15 years broadcasting on WAMU 88.5.

Gray hailed Kojo, "on behalf of 632,000 people in the District of Columbia, many, many of whom -- and I mean this quite seriously -- admire you greatly and appreciate what you do and have done for so many years."

The proclamation states: "Kojo Nnamdi has been a fixture on radio and television in the District of Columbia for four decades and has set a standard for conversations about important political and economic issues in this city."

Kojo has been a major influence on the D.C. community, with insightful and provocative dialogue. For 15 years, he has been bringing the world to Washington through his own unique perspective on The Kojo Nnamdi Show and The Politics Hour.

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