Gaining Ground: The History Of A Local Family Farm | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : The Kojo Nnamdi Show

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Gaining Ground: The History Of A Local Family Farm

While many of us have lost any connection to the sources of our food, farming and family identity are inseparable for Forrest Pritchard; his family has run a farm in the Shenandoah Valley for generations. Recently, Pritchard himself had to fight to keep his farm in the family. He joins Kojo to explore the challenges of growing food and raising livestock in today's economy, and what he learned on his personal quest to save his family farm.

A Morning At The Takoma Park Farmers Market

Forrest Pritchard, author and owner of Smith Meadows Farm in Berryville, Va., sells his products on Sundays at the Takoma Park Farmers Market in Maryland. The Kojo team ventured to the market before his appearance on the program today.

Read An Excerpt From "Gaining Ground"

Excerpt from "Gaining Ground: A Story of Farmers' Markets, Local Food, and Saving the Family Farm" by Forrest Pritchard. Copyright 2013 by Forrest Pritchard. Reprinted here by permission of Lyons Press. All rights reserved.

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