WAMU 88.5 : The Kojo Nnamdi Show

The Computer Guys And Gal

A British woman receives death treats via Twitter after lobbying to put Jane Austen on a 10-pound bank note. New revelations surface about how the government monitors our online interactions. And the latest smart phones emphasize the cameras and a connection to Google. The Computer Guys and Gal join Kojo to talk about the latest tech trends.

Apps Of The Month

The Farmers’ Market Recipe Generator inspires more than 50 combinations of produce you're likely to find in a market or C.S.A. basket.

Knee Pro III helps explain knee injuries by giving users an in-depth look of the joint. Developed in collaboration with Stanford University's School of Medicine, users can cut, zoom and rotate a knee.

Manage your weight loss with Weight Watchers Mobile. Track your food, weight and activity to stay on plan.

Gadgets Of The Month

There's a new Google phone called Moto X. The product is getting good reviews, and some people are calling it the "iPhone of the Android phones."

The hardware in Nokia's Lumia 1020 is exciting for serious photographers: 41MP, optical stabilization, fast lens.

NPR

Comic-Con Fans Continue The Epic Battle Between Science And Fiction

Fans of science fiction have long wrestled with the question of just how much science should be in their fiction. Advocates of different approaches met at San Diego's Comic-Con.
NPR

Scraped, Splattered — But Silent No More. Finally, The Dinner Plate Gets Its Say

Instagram is the Internet's semi-obsessive, borderline-creepy love letter to food. But behind every great meal is a plate doing a pretty-OK job. So a comedian made an Instagram to celebrate plates.
NPR

Leaked Democratic Party Emails Show Members Tried To Undercut Sanders

Just days before the Democratic National Committee convention gets underway, WikiLeaks releases almost 20,000 emails among DNC staff, revealing discussions of topics from Bernie Sanders to the media.
NPR

Making The Cloud Green: Tech Firms Push For Renewable Energy Sources

Few people can demand what kind of electricity they get. But Microsoft and Facebook, which operate huge, power-hungry data centers, are trying to green up the electricity grid with their buying power.

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