WAMU 88.5 : The Kojo Nnamdi Show

Computer Guys & Gal

If the uber-secret National Security Agency is poring through Verizon phone records and tapping Google and Facebook servers, what does that mean for you? Is there any privacy online? What happens when people start wearing Google Glass and recording your every move? The Computer Guys and Gal discuss privacy, social media and the future of gaming.

Apps To Protect Against Online Snooping

Sudo puts the user in charge of what data to share, rather than corporations or the government, and lets you make money from it.

Tor is a web browser that helps you defend against network surveillance by preventing anyone from learning your location or browsing habits.

The Onion Browser for iOS is a Tor-capable Web browser for smartphones.

Ways to keep your information private (even from the NSA), from credit cards and social networks to Web history and Dropbox accounts.

App Of The Month

For road trips, iExit tells you what exits, gas stations, hotels and rest areas are coming up in real time when driving on the interstate.

Gifts For Techie Grads And Dads

Good quality, affordable headphones, such as Grado SR60i, Philips CitiScape Downtown and Koss KSC75.

NPR

MTV's Rewinding The '90s With A New Channel

The '90s are back! Pokémon has taken over the world again. A Clinton is running for president. And now, MTV is reviving '90s favorites like Beavis and Butt-head on a new channel, MTV Classic.
NPR

Salvage Supperclub: A High-End Dinner In A Dumpster To Fight Food Waste

The ingredients — think wilted basil, bruised plums, garbanzo bean water — sound less than appetizing. Whipped together, they're a tasty meal that show how home cooks can use often-tossed foods.
WAMU 88.5

The Politics Hour – LIVE from Slim's Diner!

This special edition of the Politics Hour is coming to you live from Slim's Diner from Petworth in Northwest D.C.

NPR

Writing Data Onto Single Atoms, Scientists Store The Longest Text Yet

With atomic memory technology, little patterns of atoms can be arranged to represent English characters, fitting the content of more than a billion books onto the surface of a stamp.

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