WAMU 88.5 : The Kojo Nnamdi Show

The Smithsonian Explores Navigation

For much of human history, people needed specialized training to navigate from point A to point B, like learning to follow the stars or use a sextant and chronometer. Today, thanks to global positioning satellites that send signals to our phones, we can all be successful navigators. Kojo talks with two curators about the history and future of navigation and a new exhibit at the Smithsonian's Air and Space Museum called "Time and Navigation: The Untold Story of Getting from Here to There."

Photos From The Smithsonian's 'Time And Navigation' Exhibit

How GPS Works

This animation showcases the various components of the Global Positioning System and how they work together to help determine position.

NPR

At Some Stores, Readers Can Go Get A Refund For 'Watchman'

Harper Lee's Go Set a Watchman has sold millions of copies, but some feel it has not lived up to the hype. A bookstore owner in Traverse City, Mich., is giving readers a refund — and an apology.
NPR

How Percy Shelley Stirred His Politics Into His Tea Cup

In 19th century Britain, keeping sugar out of tea became a political statement against slavery. The sugar boycott was no easy choice for the radical poet, who hated slavery but loved tea.
NPR

Fox News' Debate Selection Method Is Not Without Critics

Broadcaster Fox News announces which 10 candidates will be allowed on stage for the first official Republican debate next month. NPR's Audie Cornish talks with politics editor Domenico Montanaro.
NPR

Sexist Reactions To An Ad Spark #ILookLikeAnEngineer Campaign

After being surprised by online responses to her appearance in a recruiting ad, engineer Isis Wenger wanted to see if anyone else felt like they didn't fit a "cookie-cutter mold."

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