The Politics Hour | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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The Politics Hour

Washington voters keep a longtime Democratic activist on the D.C. Council. Montgomery County gives its bag tax policy second thoughts. And Arlington County pushes forward with a streetcar project, despite being rejected for federal funding. Join us for our weekly review of the politics, policies and personalities of the District of Columbia, Maryland and Virginia.

Featured Video Clip

Metro told Montgomery County officials it won't operate the $120 million Silver Spring Transit Center, citing design flaws in the hub, which is already over budget and two years behind schedule.

Montgomery County Council Member Roger Berliner (D-District 1) said he and his colleagues learned of Metro's plan from an article in The Washington Post. Berliner called the decision "shocking and surprising," but added that construction issues "can and will be fixed." On WMATA backing out of the transit center, Berliner said, "it's not like they can claim they have no responsibility...To wash their hands of this at this moment in time and say this is all on you, I promise you our county will fight that if necessary."

Politics Hour News Quiz

Test your knowledge of the week's local headlines and happenings.

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