Septime Webre And The Washington Ballet | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Septime Webre And The Washington Ballet

Septime Webre's latest ballet adaptation of a great American novel, "Hemingway: The Sun Also Rises," transports audiences to the cafes of 1920s Paris and the running of the bulls in Pamplona, Spain. Inventive costumes, jazz numbers and dramatic choreography bring one of Hemingway's most beloved novels to life.

'The Sun Also Rises' Production Stills

From sketch to stage, characters come to life in Septime Webre's latest ballet, "The Sun Also Rises." Based on Ernest Hemingway's classic novel, the production transports audiences to the cafes of 1920s Paris and the infamous "running of the bulls" in Pamplona, Spain. In this video, see how dancers transform costume designs into wearable art.

Credits: Creative and Art Direction by Design Army. Photos by Dean Alexander. Costume Design by Helen Q. Huang. Music composed by Billy Novick. All rights reserved.

Preview The Ballet

Go behind the scenes of Septime Webre's upcoming world premiere of "Hemingway: The Sun Also Rises." Video includes dancer interview and rehearsal footage.

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