D.C. Toasts: The Black Mixology Club | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : The Kojo Nnamdi Show

D.C. Toasts: The Black Mixology Club

Prohibition provides an interesting perspective on the history of racial discrimination in the United States. A number of African-American bartenders saw their craft as a gateway to the middle class in an era when many doors were closed to black workers. Kojo talks with historians and mixologists who are now unearthing the stories -- and the recipes -- behind that generation of African-American bartenders.

Flower Pot Punch Recipe

This was a celebrated cocktail created at Hancock's restaurant, according to cocktail historian Charles Wheeler, who noted that the African American bartenders there practiced a "lost art" before Prohibition. He wrote, "In a glass filled with crushed ice were introduced sugar and the juices of lemon and lime, colored red with Grenadine, drenched to the top with Santa Cruz rum and decorated artistically with whatever fruits were in season."

From the "Cocktail Interlude" section of "Prohibition in Washington, D.C.: How Dry We Weren't" by Garrett Peck

Ingredients:
2 oz. Cruzan three-year white rum
.5 oz. lemon juice
.5 oz. lime juice
.5 oz. pineapple syrup
1 dash Grenadine

Instructions:
Fill a rocks glass with crushed ice. Add all of the ingredients and then stir until frosty. Garnish with seasonal fruits and a couple sprigs of mint.

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