Joyce Carol Oates: "The Accursed" | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Joyce Carol Oates: "The Accursed"

It's 1905, and something evil is brewing in Princeton, N.J. A bride is dragged from the altar to the underworld, a girls’ school is overrun with snakes and mysterious deaths strike the prominent and well-to-do in this university town. Historic characters like Woodrow Wilson and Jack London populate this Gothic tale of vampires, demons and, ultimately, a very dark secret.

Videos: Inside The Studio

Acclaimed author Joyce Carol Oates talks about why it took her nearly 30 years to finish her latest novel, "The Accursed." "Like most novelists, I like to rewrite completely. I'll rewrite a novel completely after I finish it because you don't really have the narrative voice and you don't really have the confidence to create the structure...But the second or third draft is very wonderful, because you're more in control," Oates said.

Novelist Joyce Carol Oates explains how she mimics a character's cadence and musicality in her writing. She says that all fiction writers bring a "mediated voice" to their work that differs from their own personal voice.

Read An Excerpt

Excerpt from "The Accursed" by Joyce Carol Oates. Copyright 2013 by Joyce Carol Oates. Reprinted by permission of Ecco. All rights reserved.

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