WAMU 88.5 : The Kojo Nnamdi Show

The Politics Hour

Virginia's governor draws up a new play for legislation to fund roads. D.C.'s attorney calls an early foul on a plan to give the city budget autonomy. And Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley contemplates another push to get anti-death penalty legislation over the goal line in Annapolis. Join us for our weekly review of the politics, policies and personalities of the District of Columbia, Maryland and Virginia.

Politics Hour Video

David Catania, D.C. Council member and chairman of the education committee, says truancy is one of the biggest problems affecting the city. Catania said about 30 to 40 percent of elementary and high school students miss two or more weeks of school, affecting graduation rates and test scores. He proposed a two-pronged solution: fire minimally effective teachers and prosecute parents based on a 20-year-old truancy law. Misdemeanor charges could include a $100 fine, five days in jail and community service. Catania also suggests a daytime curfew for students to curb truancy.

NPR

'Never Crossing The Botox Rubicon': Amanda Peet Explores Aging In Hollywood

NPR's Kelly McEvers speaks with actress Amanda Peet about her Lenny Letter essay, "Never Crossing The Botox Rubicon," and how to navigate aging in the image-obsessed entertainment industry.
NPR

When It Came To Food, Neanderthals Weren't Exactly Picky Eaters

During the Ice Age, it seems Neanderthals tended to chow down on whatever was most readily available. Early humans, on the other hand, maintained a consistent diet regardless of environmental changes.
NPR

4 Ways Donald Trump's Pro Wrestling Experience Is Like His Campaign Today

At least none of Trump's political opponents have been strapped down and had their heads shaved by him.
NPR

'The Guardian' Launches New Series Examining Online Abuse

A video was released this week where female sports journalists were read abusive online comments to their face. It's an issue that reaches far beyond that group, and The Guardian is taking it on in a series called "The Web We Want." NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with series editor Becky Gardiner and writer Nesrine Malik, who receives a lot of online abuse.

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