WAMU 88.5 : The Kojo Nnamdi Show

The Craft Of Speechwriting

Speeches are the most effective way to rally people to your cause. But if you’re a politician addressing the nation on your plan for the next four years, you have to know how to appeal to people across the spectrum, and often times, you can’t do it without a little help. Kojo discovers who’s behind the scenes and what goes into crafting a great speech.

Notable Political Speeches

Before 2004, Barack Obama was hardly known outside the state of Illinois. That year he gave a speech at the Democratic National Convention that launched him from obscurity to the national stage. His abilities as an orator convinced the American people that he could be leader of the free world. 

Dwight D. Eisenhower warned about the military-industrial complex in April 1953 in his "Chance for Peace" speech. As the conditions of the Cold War deepened, he likened increased military spending to stealing from the American people. It's a speech that was highly effective in its time for its imagery and relevance to the era.

Jennifer Granholm's energetic remarks at the 2012 DNC definitely revved up the crowds, but we are left to wonder: Who writes this stuff?

NPR

Lisa Lucas Takes The Reins At The National Book Foundation

Lucas is the third executive director in the history of the foundation, which runs the National Book Awards. Her priority? Inclusivity: "Everyone is either a reader or a potential reader," she says.
NPR

The Shocking Truth About America's Ethanol Law: It Doesn't Matter (For Now)

Ted Cruz doesn't like the law that requires the use of ethanol in gasoline. So what would happen if it was abolished? The surprising answer: not much, probably.
WAMU 88.5

The Latest on the Military, Political and Humanitarian Crises in Syria

Russia continues airstrikes in Syria. Secretary Kerry meets with world leaders in an attempt to resolve the country’s five-year civil war. A panel joins Diane to discuss the latest on the military, political and humanitarian crises facing Syria.

NPR

Twitter Tries A New Kind Of Timeline By Predicting What May Interest You

Twitter has struggled to attract new users. Its latest effort at rejuvenation is a new kind of timeline that predicts which older posts you might not want to miss and displays them on top.

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