WAMU 88.5 : The Kojo Nnamdi Show

Virginia's lieutenant governor suspends his gubernatorial campaign, seemingly clearing the way for the commonwealth's attorney general to grab the nomination. One of the most familiar faces in Montgomery County politics says he wants his old job back. And D.C. candidates start lining up for the Council's latest job opening. Join us for our weekly review of the politics, policies and personalities of the District of Columbia, Maryland and Virginia.

Politics Hour Video

It's been said the Obama administration won reelection in part due to effective use of voter data and information. With gubernatorial elections coming up in Virginia in 2013, it was widely expected the Obama campaign would share that database with Virginia Democrats.

On today's Politics Hour, Virginia Democratic Party chairman Brian Moran confirmed the state party does have access to about one million voter records. "We now have that data, and we'll mine that data and communicate with those individuals," Moran said. "That is just tremendous with respect to looking forward to 2013," he added.

The Obama for America campaign compiled a vast database that provides contact information and consumer data to help campaign workers analyze what issues matter most to voters. The records also detail what will best motivate them to donate, volunteer and vote.

NPR

Far From 'Infinitesimal': A Mathematical Paradox's Role In History

It seems like a simple question: How many parts can you divide a line into? The troublesome answer was square at the root of two of Europe's greatest social crises.
NPR

Soup to Nuts, Restaurants Smoke It All

While you won't find cigarettes in restaurants anymore, some smoking isn't banned. It's not just meat, either; it's hot to smoke just about anything edible.
WAMU 88.5

Virginia Remains At Odds With Feds On Medicaid Expansion

Lawmakers in Virginia continue to resist the $9.6 billion Medicaid expansion on offer from the federal government as part of the Affordable Care Act.

NPR

Watch For The Blind Lets You Feel Time Passing

A new watch allows the blind to feel time on their wrists. Designer Hyungsoo Kim tells NPR's Wade Goodwyn his watch allows users to tell time accurately without revealing their disabilities.

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