WAMU 88.5 : The Kojo Nnamdi Show

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Free Speech And Activism In Egypt, After The Revolution

During the Egyptian Revolution, journalist Shahira Amin resigned from a state-owned TV network to protest its coverage of Tahrir Square protests. Film star and director Khaled Abol Naga was among the millions who participated in the protests. Today, Egypt is no longer ruled by a dictator. But some worry the political environment is becoming increasingly intolerant toward free speech and women's rights. Kojo talks with Amin and Abol Naga about their view of Egypt from the inside.

Video: Inside The Studio

Journalist Shahira Amin and actor Khaled Abol Naga discussed Egypt in the post-Mubarak era and their concerns with the country's new constitution. "We are calling for a more egalitarian, more democratic constitution. One that represents all Egyptians: secularists, liberals and women, especially," Amin said. Naga said there's a "big disconnect" between what Egyptian citizens want and what measures government leaders are implementing.

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Shahira Amin explained her decision to resign from state-controlled Nile TV, saying its coverage was being used as a "propaganda machine."

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In this 2011 TEDxWomen talk, Shahira Amin discusses post-revolutionary Egypt, how to move forward and how women are making a difference.

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