WAMU 88.5 : The Kojo Nnamdi Show

Headphones, Technology And Culture

For many Americans, music and podcasts serve as a constant soundtrack to their daily routines. In offices with open floor plans, workers don headphones to block out noise. Others couldn't get through a workout or their daily commute without music pumping through earbuds. Studies have come to differing conclusions about whether listening to music helps or hinders productivity. More troubling is the increase in permanent hearing loss associated with headphone use. We consider the technology, culture and safe use of this ubiquitous accessory.

How Loud Is That Sound?

Loudness is measured in decibles. Hearing loss can occur when you have prolonged exposure to a noise source over 90 dB. Sound on most MP3 players reaches up to 110 dB -- that's 25 dB higher than the recommended maximum listening volume. For comparison, this is how loud some common environmental sounds are:

Sources: American Tinnitus Association and the National Hearing Conservation Association.

Video: How The Ear Works

Follow the path that sound takes through the ear, and learn how excessive loudness can damage hearing.

NPR

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Most James Beard awards go to haute cuisine, but one prize recognizes classic neighborhood joints. And increasingly, the winners are immigrants whose cultures haven't yet dissolved in the melting pot.
NPR

At Food World 'Oscars,' Category Sneakily Redefines All-American Cuisine

Most James Beard awards go to haute cuisine, but one prize recognizes classic neighborhood joints. And increasingly, the winners are immigrants whose cultures haven't yet dissolved in the melting pot.
WAMU 88.5

D.C.'s 17-Year-Old Charitable Trust Bankrupts

The DC Trust has declared bankruptcy leaving over 70 groups that rely on their funding with questions about what went wrong and what happens next.

WAMU 88.5

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Kojo explores the local state of diversity in STEM with educators who are looking to change it and a journalist who's been tracking it.

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