WAMU 88.5 : The Kojo Nnamdi Show

The Politics Hour

It's full steam ahead as advocates for D.C. voting rights push both major political parties ahead of their national conventions. Activists in Maryland gear up for the wave of ballot initiatives coming down the tracks in the fall. And federal authorities give the green light to a new voter identification law in Virginia. Join us for our weekly review of the politics, policies and personalities of the District of Columbia, Maryland and Virginia.

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Politics Hour Video

NAACP President and CEO Benjamin Jealous talked about the organization's agenda at the Republican National Convention next week in Tampa, Fla. Jealous said criminal justice issues, such as voting rights for felons, get the most traction with Republicans. "We seek to really make visible the fact that there are Republican leaders who care about civil rights," Jealous said.

NPR

Writer James Alan McPherson, Winner Of Pulitzer, MacArthur And Guggenheim, Dies At 72

McPherson, the first African-American to win the Pulitzer Prize for fiction, has died at 72. His work explored the intersection of white and black lives with deftness, subtlety and wry humor.
NPR

Oyster Archaeology: Ancient Trash Holds Clues To Sustainable Harvesting

Modern-day oyster populations in the Chesapeake are dwindling, but a multi-millennia archaeological survey shows that wasn't always the case. Native Americans harvested the shellfish sustainably.

WAMU 88.5

Your Turn: Ronald Reagan's Shooter, Freddie Gray Verdicts And More

Have opinions about the Democratic National Convention, or the verdicts from the Freddie Gray cases? It's your turn to talk.

NPR

Writing Data Onto Single Atoms, Scientists Store The Longest Text Yet

With atomic memory technology, little patterns of atoms can be arranged to represent English characters, fitting the content of more than a billion books onto the surface of a stamp.

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