WAMU 88.5 : The Kojo Nnamdi Show

The Politics Hour

It's full steam ahead as advocates for D.C. voting rights push both major political parties ahead of their national conventions. Activists in Maryland gear up for the wave of ballot initiatives coming down the tracks in the fall. And federal authorities give the green light to a new voter identification law in Virginia. Join us for our weekly review of the politics, policies and personalities of the District of Columbia, Maryland and Virginia.

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Politics Hour Video

NAACP President and CEO Benjamin Jealous talked about the organization's agenda at the Republican National Convention next week in Tampa, Fla. Jealous said criminal justice issues, such as voting rights for felons, get the most traction with Republicans. "We seek to really make visible the fact that there are Republican leaders who care about civil rights," Jealous said.

WAMU 88.5

Remains In Jamestown Linked To Early Colonial Leaders

Scientists from the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History and The Jamestown Rediscovery Foundation say they've identified four men buried in the earliest English church in America.
WAMU 88.5

The Democracy Of The Diner

Whether the decor is faux '50s silver and neon or authentic greasy spoon, diners are classic Americana, down to the familiar menu items. Rich, poor, black, white--all rub shoulders in the vinyl booths and at formica counters. We explore the enduring appeal and nostalgia of the diner.

WAMU 88.5

D.C. Council Member David Grosso

D.C. Council Member and Chair of the Committee on Education David Grosso joins us to discuss local public policy issues, including the challenges facing D.C. Public Schools.

NPR

Researchers Warn Against 'Autonomous Weapons' Arms Race

Already, researcher Stuart Russell says, sentry robots in South Korea "can spot and track a human being for a distance of 2 miles — and can very accurately kill that person."

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