A Smaller Government: Risks, Rewards, Reform | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : The Kojo Nnamdi Show

A Smaller Government: Risks, Rewards, Reform

Both sides of the Congressional aisle can see that big federal spending cuts could hit the D.C. region hard.
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Both sides of the Congressional aisle can see that big federal spending cuts could hit the D.C. region hard.

Agreed to last summer by Congress and called "sequestration," more than $100 billion in automatic federal budget cuts are scheduled to go into effect beginning January 2013. As a result, federal employees, government contractors (defense and otherwise), local officials and others are being forced to consider best and worst-case scenarios of "smaller government" and dramatically reduced federal spending. Join Kojo to explore what we know and don't know about the cuts, the anticipatory planning underway across various different sectors in our community, how you will be affected (even if you are not a federal worker or contractor) and whether our region is prepared for this reality -- emotionally and financially -- going forward.

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