A Smaller Government: Risks, Rewards, Reform | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : The Kojo Nnamdi Show

A Smaller Government: Risks, Rewards, Reform

Both sides of the Congressional aisle can see that big federal spending cuts could hit the D.C. region hard.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lincolnblues/2090796919/
Both sides of the Congressional aisle can see that big federal spending cuts could hit the D.C. region hard.

Agreed to last summer by Congress and called "sequestration," more than $100 billion in automatic federal budget cuts are scheduled to go into effect beginning January 2013. As a result, federal employees, government contractors (defense and otherwise), local officials and others are being forced to consider best and worst-case scenarios of "smaller government" and dramatically reduced federal spending. Join Kojo to explore what we know and don't know about the cuts, the anticipatory planning underway across various different sectors in our community, how you will be affected (even if you are not a federal worker or contractor) and whether our region is prepared for this reality -- emotionally and financially -- going forward.

NPR

How To Sell Diverse Books: A Bookstore Owner's Advice

It's not news that the publishing world isn't very diverse. But over on the other side of the industry, how do owners of neighborhood bookstores try to sell books for or about people of color?
NPR

Can Quinoa Take Root On The 'Roof Of The World'?

Quinoa, once a homebody crop, crossed the Atlantic for the first time this century. Now the Food and Agriculture Organization has a hunch it can thrive in Central and Southwest Asia.
NPR

North Carolina Senate Race Shapes Up As Unpopularity Contest

One of the most expensive Senate races this year is in North Carolina, where Democratic incumbent Kay Hagen is trying to keep her job. Her approval numbers are dismal, but so are those for her GOP opponent, North Carolina House Speaker Thom Tillis.
NPR

Islamic State Uses Online Strategies To Get Its Message Out

Experts say the videotaped killing of journalist James Foley is part of a broader propaganda strategy by Islamist militants. The group, the Islamic State, has become a master of the video medium.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.