WAMU 88.5 : The Kojo Nnamdi Show

The Politics Hour

D.C.'s mayor fends off new accusations that his 2010 campaign had unlawful access to a database of public housing residents. Mitt Romney's presidential campaign calls on Virginia officials to investigate voter registration forms mailed in the commonwealth. And a special legislative session on casino gambling appears to be back in the cards in Maryland. Join us for our weekly review of the politics, policies and personalities of the District of Columbia, Maryland and Virginia.

Politics Hour Video

Robert Spagnoletti, chairman of the new D.C. Board of Ethics and Government Accountability, talked about the enforcement authority the board will have to investigate civil infractions. "We actually have much broader subpoena power" than the attorney general's office, he said. Spagnoletti, who works full time as an attorney and represents clients in disputes with the D.C. government, responded to questions of a potential conflict of interest. He said there is a 2 percent chance that one of his cases would involve the city and that he would recuse himself from legal matters touching on ethics issues.

NPR

National Museum of African American History Opens Its Doors

More than 100 years after it was originally proposed, the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture is opening its doors in Washington, D.C.
NPR

While Everyone Was Partying At Woodstock, I Was Stuck At Schrafft's

The chain restaurant that catered to women helped redefine how Americans eat, according to a new book. For NPR's Lynn Neary, it also defined how she did and didn't fit with the counterculture.
NPR

Newspaper Endorsements Matter Most When They're Unexpected

The New York Times endorsed Hillary Clinton on Saturday, but an endorsement that came the day before from a smaller paper may matter more to its readers, for the simple fact that it was unexpected.
NPR

As Our Jobs Are Automated, Some Say We'll Need A Guaranteed Basic Income

How will the economy provide economic opportunities if employers need fewer workers in the future? A growing number of people in Silicon Valley are saying the only realistic answer is a basic income.

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