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Supreme Court Upholds Federal Health Care Law

Activists gathered on the steps of the Supreme Court to hear their ruling on the Affordable Care Act Thursday, June 28.
Matt Laslo
Activists gathered on the steps of the Supreme Court to hear their ruling on the Affordable Care Act Thursday, June 28.

This morning, the U.S. Supreme Court largely upheld the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Now, local and state officials are scrambling to digest the ruling and comply with upcoming deadlines. Maryland and the District have already spent millions setting up the insurance exchanges mandated by the law. Virginia, which challenged the law in federal court, will have to accelerate preparations. We get local reactions to the Supreme Court ruling.

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Rep. Andy Harris (R-MD) responded to a caller's question about whether there is real potential for a repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Harris said the law would be repealed if presumptive Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney wins the election and if Republicans gain a simple majority in the House of Representatives in November. Maryland Attorney General Douglas Gansler said Republicans are in a "political conundrum" because Americans will have had more exposure to the law by 2013, making it more difficult for them to repeal the measure.

Supreme Court Decision On Health Care Reform

The full text of the Supreme Court opinion in National Federation of Independent Business et al. vs. Sebelius, Secretary of Health and Human Services et al.:

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