How Airports And Airlines Will Shape The World | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : The Kojo Nnamdi Show

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How Airports And Airlines Will Shape The World

Picture this: an airport not on the periphery of the city but in the center of it, with businesses, residences and ground transportation networks radiating outward. Some experts say global commerce and ubiquitous air travel will force us to redesign our urban layout, giving airports and airlines a more central spot. Kojo explores cities -- from Washington to Seoul to Beijing -- where this shift is already taking place.

Related Images

A spatially compressed model of the Aerotropolis showing its current and likely future evolution is illustrated below. No Aerotropolis will look exactly like this but most will eventually take on similar features, led by newer "greenfield" airports less constrained by decades of prior surrounding development. The Aerotropolis is thus much more of a dynamic, forward-looking model than a static, cross-sectional model reflecting historic airport-area development to date. Image courtesy of John Kasarda.
Image courtesy of John Kasarda

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